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scro1908
Posted: Jul 04, 2018 - 10:54 am


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I was on Pigeon last night bass fishing and did alright for a short 2 hours of fishing. We all need to be mindful of the temps not only for ourselves but the fish. The water temp last night was 87 degrees. Muskies especially. They cannot handle these soaring surface temps very well. A long fight in this degree of water can have a very negative affect on them.

Largemouth tend to be pretty hardy, smallies and walleye are a little more prone to stress under these temperatures. I'm not an expert on this issue in any way. If you are only out for catch and release I would suggest releasing immediately. If your fishing any tourneys I would strongly suggest keeping some ice on hand and running your livewell on manual so fresh water is always coming in. Also, running an aerator would be very beneficial.

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ilyukha
Posted: Jul 04, 2018 - 01:36 pm


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Good topic, thanks for posting. All good points.

It looks like we are having one of those hot summers this year and the heat wave will stick around for awhile.

I appreciate if anyone can recommend a good livewell aerator.

I normally release most of the fish, especially in summer but occasionally take a few home.

I am just putting the fish I plan to keep right into the cooler filled with ice but I am thinking if the livewell with aerator will be a better choice.

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Fossy47
Posted: Jul 04, 2018 - 03:59 pm


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Great post sco1908. Thanks for highlighting we all need to be aware of the additional stress associated with very hot weather & very warm water.

Cheers,

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wildmar
Posted: Jul 05, 2018 - 08:09 am


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87 Degrees! That is absolutely insane... this will definitely impact survival rates.

Sturgeon last week was 80.

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deerhunter
Posted: Jul 05, 2018 - 10:31 am


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Good Information. We should all keep this in mind while we are fishing.

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Attila
Posted: Jul 05, 2018 - 12:06 pm


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Great suggestion and points made scro, thanks for bringing it up.

I was looking at an aerator the other day and am planning on taking a cooler with me with some ice blocks in it the next time I go fishing just in case I catch a stressed out fish so that I can drop it in there to recouperate before releasing it.

At most the fish I landed yesterday were out of the water for less than a minute and all swam away strongly upon release, but in order to ensure the survival of the fishery, I'm thinking I'll have a camera already setup to take a photo instead of digging for a cell phone to take a selfie....just makes sense in weather like this.

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dmorrs35
Posted: Jul 05, 2018 - 12:31 pm


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87! that is insane! as a muskie guy, if you are targeting them, haul them in fast and cut hooks! the rule of thumb I go by from hookset to release is 3 minutes tops, but with these hot temps reported by scro, half that. haul that fish in, cut all hooks without a second thought while your camera man is ready, extremely quick measurement, pic release. there will be muskie caught by C&R fisherman this summer that will die of stress unfortunately. please, if you are targeting them. use nothing LESS than a heavy action rod, with 80 pound test and have a net man with you! if your pic isn't good, do not wait for a second pic to be taken.

for me its hard to fish when it is so hot. so I probably wont even be fishing too much at all this summer. but if I am. I wont target them in anything above 80f... if I killed a muskie, id be devastated.

with regards to the ice on hand suggestion. it might help the fish lower its stress, but wouldn't it also potentially cause shock on some fish if you are holding them in ice water around 70-75f then release them into that 87f water temps? the same reason pet stores suggest you float the fish for 10-15 minutes prior to letting them lose? a similar effect to the drive home after work where you are blasting your AC, stressed from the stop and go traffic, then you get home and you step outside into that 35 (40+ with humidity) and you immediately start sweating?

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Attila
Posted: Jul 05, 2018 - 12:34 pm


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QUOTE (dmorrs35 @ Jul 05, 2018 - 01:31 pm)
87! that is insane! as a muskie guy, if you are targeting them, haul them in fast and cut hooks! the rule of thumb I go by from hookset to release is 3 minutes tops, but with these hot temps reported by scro, half that. haul that fish in, cut all hooks without a second thought while your camera man is ready, extremely quick measurement, pic release. there will be muskie caught by C&R fisherman this summer that will die of stress unfortunately. please, if you are targeting them. use nothing LESS than a heavy action rod, with 80 pound test and have a net man with you! if your pic isn't good, do not wait for a second pic to be taken.

for me its hard to fish when it is so hot. so I probably wont even be fishing too much at all this summer. but if I am. I wont target them in anything above 80f... if I killed a muskie, id be devastated.

with regards to the ice on hand suggestion. it might help the fish lower its stress, but wouldn't it also potentially cause shock on some fish if you are holding them in ice water around 70-75f then release them into that 87f water temps? the same reason pet stores suggest you float the fish for 10-15 minutes prior to letting them lose?

Just read an article on this exact topic; https://www.wvgazettemail.com/outdoors/dela...bc2b8853e5.html

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Seguin Fisher
Posted: Jul 05, 2018 - 02:40 pm


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I agree with what dmorrs said, not sure if a cooler on shore is a good idea ( unless your gonna fillet them ). If you had a livewell in a boat that could constantly bring in fresh water, and the fish weren’t brought up from deep, cooler water ( deep offshore smallies), they’d likely be alright as long as the pumps kept flowing fresh water in. For something on shore, your likely catching it in shallow, warm water, then dropping it in cooler water, then back in the warm lake. I’d say in that case, your best just to quickly release them in the lake and let them swim on they’re own. Bass are pretty tough customers, but I don’t think they would benefit from a cool water shock before release.

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Attila
Posted: Jul 05, 2018 - 03:40 pm


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I think you both have reasonable points...immediate release would be better than dipping them in ice water first...

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Putaforkinya
Posted: Jul 05, 2018 - 08:03 pm


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Very good call out @scro
Must be very careful with wally's , smallie's, and espeicailly muskie releases.

As for the arguments about shock.
Ice is good u can't think about it comparativly to fish from a pet store. Pet store fish are much much smaller and so the sudden temperature adjustment of even a couple degrees shocks their little bodies much quicker and has a greater affect. Think of it this way would putting your baby toe in minus 20 not freeze much quicker than your entire upper leg?

Now I'm not saying if u take a bass out of 80+ degrees and give him an ice bass that he will be fine. But u can out it straight in to colder water and add ice and it will be fine. The ice water is higher in oxegyn and there for takes the stress off of the fish and as we all know stress is a major contributing factor to a fish's death after being handled or taken out of its original habitat.

Before the release of a fish thats been in a livewell i usually make sure the water is moderately colder then the lake water but not rediculously colder. Then relase the fish in a depth of about 5fow -6fow as it will be more oxygenated and the fish can rest on the bottom until they gets back its strength to swim to their desired depths.

In saying that if these temps keep up I will definatly be driving fish out to cooler water before their release in future tournaments.

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Putaforkinya
Posted: Jul 05, 2018 - 08:16 pm


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A good article on keeping your bass alive.

https://m.bassmaster.com/aaron-martens/live...-big-bass-alivelink

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doubleblue44
Posted: Jul 06, 2018 - 05:22 am


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my son and I have a great assemble line (or nascar tire change?) drill for release for musky, we can do it super fast, before I net we have pliers, bolt cutters (a must), camera ready - and a gentle release back with one of us holding by the tail in the water and boom they take off!!!
Be prepared for the worse, the second I cant get a hook out with pliers I cut the hook or even a small piece of net if they have twirled inside the net (easy repair after). My 2 cents!!

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Chad
Posted: Jul 08, 2018 - 08:11 pm


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QUOTE (doubleblue44 @ Jul 06, 2018 - 05:22 am)
my son and I have a great assemble line (or nascar tire change?) drill for release for musky, we can do it super fast, before I net we have pliers, bolt cutters (a must), camera ready - and a gentle release back with one of us holding by the tail in the water and boom they take off!!!
Be prepared for the worse, the second I cant get a hook out with pliers I cut the hook or even a small piece of net if they have twirled inside the net (easy repair after). My 2 cents!!

Exactly. Be prepared, sacrifice some terminal tackle, get that pic and take your time with the release as they recover.

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