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> 2021 Walleye Slot Size Recommendation, LNFMP meeting
ldub
Posted: Oct 22, 2020 - 03:32 pm


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Nothing worse then using something like this pandemic as an excuse to put off doing your job or providing services. If there's a will there's a way, obviously Mnr doesn't have the will and took the easy way out, wasting tax dollars the whole time.

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Grumpa
Posted: Oct 22, 2020 - 08:16 pm


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QUOTE (ldub @ Oct 22, 2020 - 03:32 pm)
Nothing worse then using something like this pandemic as an excuse to put off doing your job or providing services. If there's a will there's a way, obviously Mnr doesn't have the will and took the easy way out, wasting tax dollars the whole time.

Personally, I get the disappointment and the feeling that the OMNRF hasn't lived up to their mandate and completed the final stage (the public consultation segment) of the process this year, as hoped and orginally intend.
The ministry could have attempted to complete the task virtually or even as a write-in process similar to what was undertaken with other recent regulations (ie the cormorant culling regs).
But neither was ultimately deemed feasible or attempted. Many other highly anticipated regulation changes were also delayed province wide with the virus outbreak...Nipissing isn't the only jurisdiction waiting for possible announced changes.
But I think we have to go back, once again, to the original lake Nipissing management plan and remember the conditions and directive it was established under.
It was undertaken as a 10 year management plan, with a suggested 5 year 'interim' review...that permitted 'possible' regulation adjustments, or tweaks, should the science and the fishery's recovery dictate that was advisable.
Despite the management plans established objectives and stated time frame, there's been repeated calls by some to speed up the process and condense the decision making.
I get that...everybody wants the recovery of the fishery to the 1970's/80's levels as soon as possible. Everybody involved wants that. But we've waited this long...a bit longer isn't going to be a complete hardship at this point...IMO.
Data collection from a variety of sources was to take place throughout the management plan...so continued collection should be anticipated and expected. The more data you have, hopefully, better decisions you can make.
The Nipissing fishery assessment was never intended to be a 5 year process and done.
It was designed to run 10 years, to start...with the long term, fully 'sustainable' recovery of the fishery as its goal.
It's certainly disappointing we may not see regulation changes as soon as hoped...but not the end of the world...the fishery is already in a much better place then it was in the fall of 2013.

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Muskyhunter
Posted: Oct 23, 2020 - 07:26 am


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For sure.

Isn't that Environmental Online Registry Board used by the MNRF for public consultation now?



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ripnjig
Posted: Oct 26, 2020 - 04:12 pm


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I have been fishing Nip for the past 40+ years and it is my favorite lake in terms of scenery and fishability. Good success on the shoals on the big lake with options in the inner bays when she's windy. Have seen many reg. changes and they always seem to have justification.
I wasn't fussy about the last change with (2) at 18.1+ inches and their logic at the time that the big girls do not lay as many eggs as the high numbers of smaller walleye that need a chance to spawn.
I must say over the last 5 years the ratio of keepers per numbers caught has steadily improved for me at least seeing progression from approx. 1 in 40 to now approx. 1 in 5 with some exceptional outings with the first 2 caught being keepers. I don't keep anything over 22"
and found most keepers were 18.5 - 19.5". I actually prefer eating jumbo perch. Both species were plentiful in July and Aug. but not so much in Sept.
Pike and LM bass in my opinion seems to be declining but SM bass has been off the scale with many in the 17 - 20" range. Great fun but I don't eat them.
I say keep the same system for the next couple years and then reassess as it seems to be working. What's the hurry do it right. I have not seen the same volume of netting activities as well.
Failing that, I'm for Fatrap's slot recommendation.
Cheers.

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ldub
Posted: Oct 27, 2020 - 03:07 pm


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No doubt people living on the lake and fishing it whenever they like will have a different opinion then people that visit once or twice a year. I totally understand that. If Nip was my home lake, I would have no problem having regs that deter people from coming and taking my fish.

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Grumpa
Posted: Oct 27, 2020 - 07:24 pm


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QUOTE (ldub @ Oct 27, 2020 - 03:07 pm)
No doubt people living on the lake and fishing it whenever they like will have a different opinion then people that visit once or twice a year. I totally understand that. If Nip was my home lake, I would have no problem having regs that deter people from coming and taking my fish.

Oddly interesting perspective on the subject...but pure conjecture.
It more or less assumes a selfish, self serving intent by lake residents and local fishermen...which couldn't be further from the truth.
Having been a visitor to the lake for 50 years and then residing on it for 15, I can say emphatically, resident anglers aren't even remotely consumed by thoughts of 'hording' fish for themselves via delayed regulation changes.
What fills and consumes the thoughts of local resident anglers is stewardship of the resource...the long term health and sustainability of the entire fishery......for everyone's benefit.
If the fishery is productive and self sustaining...everyone wins...native communities, residents, their neighbors, families and friends, businesses and visitors for years to come...not to mention the entire lakes ecosystem will benefit.
It's the bigger picture outlook.
Getting the fishery's management piece right, through a science based approach...benefits 'all' fishermen...current and future.
If some feel moving the fishery safely back to long term health...through slow, measured, science backed planning...somehow favors local anglers...then so be it.
Thankfully, those types of considerations play no part in management of the lakes fishery.

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Neil
Posted: Oct 27, 2020 - 08:44 pm


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Thanks Grumpa for your thoughtful comments and for pointing out the science based management plan. I don't know why folks these days don't want to consider the in depth science that is driving the decisions to hopefully bring this amazing fishery back to a healthy state that will as you say sustain all stakeholders for many years to come.

I too have been a visitor to the lake for 52 years and an owner for 9. My family had been visiting the lake for 25 years before that. We have seen the cycles that overfishing and subsequent restocking have created. I think it is extreemly important that this fishery and landscape be presevered for many future generations to come. Short term gain helps only the short sighted.

I for a few reasons have not wet a line for two years so for someone to say we are just trying to keep the fish for the lake owners to me is absurd! One of the reasons is that I do not want to keep a breading sized fish. That is my decission and mine alone but I hope it helps. That is not the only reason but one of the main ones.

I have a lot of memories fishing with my grandma and grandpa along with some father sons trip that I cherish and hope many other families get the opportunity to create memories of their own.

I to wish nothing but success to folks that try and make a living on and around this lake. It has been trying even before Covid but even more so now. Their livelihood is a big part of the local economy.

Neil

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ZzzAngler
Posted: Oct 28, 2020 - 07:23 am


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QUOTE (Grumpa @ Oct 27, 2020 - 07:24 pm)
QUOTE (ldub @ Oct 27, 2020 - 03:07 pm)
No doubt people living on the lake and fishing it whenever they like will have a different opinion then people that visit once or twice a year. I totally understand that. If Nip was my home lake, I would have no problem having regs that deter people from coming and taking my fish.

Oddly interesting perspective on the subject...but pure conjecture.
It more or less assumes a selfish, self serving intent by lake residents and local fishermen...which couldn't be further from the truth.
Having been a visitor to the lake for 50 years and then residing on it for 15, I can say emphatically, resident anglers aren't even remotely consumed by thoughts of 'hording' fish for themselves via delayed regulation changes.
What fills and consumes the thoughts of local resident anglers is stewardship of the resource...the long term health and sustainability of the entire fishery......for everyone's benefit.
If the fishery is productive and self sustaining...everyone wins...native communities, residents, their neighbors, families and friends, businesses and visitors for years to come...not to mention the entire lakes ecosystem will benefit.
It's the bigger picture outlook.
Getting the fishery's management piece right, through a science based approach...benefits 'all' fishermen...current and future.
If some feel moving the fishery safely back to long term health...through slow, measured, science backed planning...somehow favors local anglers...then so be it.
Thankfully, those types of considerations play no part in management of the lakes fishery.

Well said Grumpa, I could not have said it as eloquently myself! As a more recent resident of the Lake, I whole heartedly agree with your outlook and the fact that the long term health of the lake and the fishery is the priority.

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Longshank
Posted: Oct 28, 2020 - 01:18 pm


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Whatever happened to the concept of just going fishing to have fun, meaning that whatever the current regs or proposed regulation changes may be this body of water still offers some great angling opportunities with multiple species

Would I like to be able to keep of couple of eaters on my annual ice fishing trip up there....Sure, but if that's not the case I still go and have a great time

Lots of action is still available and alternate species like perch and pike are there for table fare

Cisco are fun to catch as well as the odd burbot and whitefish

I go to get away from the city for a few days and just totally enjoy the whole package

Fishing with family .. Supporting the operators Building annual memories


How can you beat that?

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ldub
Posted: Oct 28, 2020 - 03:50 pm


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I truly believe if Nipissing wasn't the only large walleye destination within driving distance of Ontario's largest population the regs would be much different. Just look at nosbosing, same area much different walleye regs. The fact that Nipissing remains a very popular destination definitely factors into the regs changing or not. It would be nice if all decisions regarding fishing and hunting were based on science but that is simply untrue. Also it's nice that the anglers on this board welcome and enjoy tourist, but that certainly wouldn't represent all locals. Like I said Nipissing is a large beautifull lake full of fish, and as long as the tourist dollars keep pouring in there is no pressure to change the walleye regs. Finally yes when I spend a boat load of cash for a weekend of fishing and fun in Northbay, I do expect a fish fry, a Walleye fish fry that is.

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Neil
Posted: Oct 28, 2020 - 07:53 pm


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QUOTE (ldub @ Oct 28, 2020 - 03:50 pm)
I truly believe if Nipissing wasn't the only large walleye destination within driving distance of Ontario's largest population the regs would be much different. Just look at nosbosing, same area much different walleye regs. The fact that Nipissing remains a very popular destination definitely factors into the regs changing or not. It would be nice if all decisions regarding fishing and hunting were based on science but that is simply untrue. Also it's nice that the anglers on this board welcome and enjoy tourist, but that certainly wouldn't represent all locals. Like I said Nipissing is a large beautifull lake full of fish, and as long as the tourist dollars keep pouring in there is no pressure to change the walleye regs. Finally yes when I spend a boat load of cash for a weekend of fishing and fun in Northbay, I do expect a fish fry, a Walleye fish fry that is.

Maybe Nosbonsing does not having the numbers of walleye that Nipissing has is the reason for the difference in regulations. It surely does not have the fishing pressure. Different lake different regulations needed.
Please provide proof the regs are not being implemented based on science. Everything I read indicates that that is what is happening. Taking an abundant species of any kind and pushing it to extinction for short term gain is just wrong.
The entire area here around Lake Nipissing needs the tourism dollars including all the private owners. The economy is heavily dependent on tourism. It affects everyone's property values. It is much different than how things are in southern Ontario in place like Lake Simcoe where lake front owners are trying to restrict access.
Please be patient with the recovery plan as it really sounds like it is working. The near north welcomes everyone and hope that this one year setback due to an unprecedented pandemic doesn't stop you from visiting again.
Like I said earlier my family has been visiting the are for about 85 years now. Back then it was starting in Hamilton heading over the swing bridge at the Hamilton Habour entrance, taking Lakshore into Toronto, and taking a left at Young street north to Callander. 10 to 11 hour trip.
Let's keep this resource going for another 85 years and then some!

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fishmagnet
Posted: Oct 28, 2020 - 08:16 pm


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If walleye is so crucial for the trip to Nipp then perhaps freeze some or purchase some prior to your trip and keep the receipt..
I never like to encourage buying walleye from a store but maybe this could be a solution to the folks that have to have a walleye fry on their trips.. Like mentioned there are other fish that can be caught and eaten.. There's never any guarantee that you will catch any fish on any given day..
Everyone enjoys the fish fry but it's not a mandatory thing for me..My thrill is never knowing what's at the bottom of the line and that's what brings me back, not the fish fry...
Any ice up that easy yet..
Lol...

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ripnjig
Posted: Oct 28, 2020 - 08:44 pm


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Neil,
I have experienced that exact route and timeline from Hamilton. Now with the road improvements and bypass 3.75 hours.
Even if it were still a 10 hour trip a would gladly make it multiple times a season. Best memories and experiences of my life with family hopefully many more.
Long live Lady Nip.

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Neil
Posted: Oct 28, 2020 - 09:39 pm


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QUOTE (ripnjig @ Oct 28, 2020 - 08:44 pm)
Neil,
I have experienced that exact route and timeline from Hamilton. Now with the road improvements and bypass 3.75 hours.
Even if it were still a 10 hour trip a would gladly make it multiple times a season. Best memories and experiences of my life with family hopefully many more.
Long live Lady Nip.

Ripnjig,

Memories is what it is all about. It is great to hear someone else remembering what it was like to reach Nipissing before the days of the 400 and other southern Ontario highways.Nipissing has been a destination for longer than reliable transportation existeted. Which I believe speaks volumes towards its allure.
I am thankful everyday for my family's desire for spending 10 or 11 hours coming up here introducing me to the area.it is amazing here and I hope anyone that wants to visit does. Memories are created every day up here!

Neil

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Grumpa
Posted: Oct 28, 2020 - 11:01 pm


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QUOTE (ldub @ Oct 28, 2020 - 03:50 pm)
I truly believe if Nipissing wasn't the only large walleye destination within driving distance of Ontario's largest population the regs would be much different. Just look at nosbosing, same area much different walleye regs. The fact that Nipissing remains a very popular destination definitely factors into the regs changing or not. It would be nice if all decisions regarding fishing and hunting were based on science but that is simply untrue. Also it's nice that the anglers on this board welcome and enjoy tourist, but that certainly wouldn't represent all locals. Like I said Nipissing is a large beautifull lake full of fish, and as long as the tourist dollars keep pouring in there is no pressure to change the walleye regs. Finally yes when I spend a boat load of cash for a weekend of fishing and fun in Northbay, I do expect a fish fry, a Walleye fish fry that is.

Sorry, but there's really nothing here based on fact. Just personal opinion and unsubstantiated conjecture...no verification, no proof. Clearly, everyone's entitled to their own opinion...but just stating something doesn't make it true nor factual.
Consider the first statement regarding Nipissing's walleye fishery.
Much larger walleye fisheries do actually exist in closer proximity to Toronto then Lake Nipissing...Bay of Quinte, Niagara river and of course Lake Erie, the largest walleye fishery in Ontario...just to name a few. I fished Erie for 40+ years, fish it even now. Erie's walleye fishery is exploding once again...the 2018 & 19 hatches were unprecedented...2019's the second largest on record. The number and poundage of walleye caught on Erie dwarfs Nipissing. You want to catch and keep fish...travel to any number of locations on Erie, pick one, shorter drive time from TO and limits are higher. The only thing Nipissing has over those other walleye fisheries, other then it's picturesque northern setting...is a longer fishable season based pretty much on guaranteed ice.
Fact of the matter is that the current regs in place on Nipissing were the product of extensive data collection, over decades, and thoughtful collaborative decision making by a wide array of stakeholders and fisheries experts...all of which is available, to those willing to look, in the lakes management plan.
The lakes path to recovery, since the introduction of the 2014 regs, is based 'solely' on the science, otherwise, we would have all continued plucking out juvenile fish that never fully had a chance to spawn.
Any new or revised regulations going forward will be based on the same and continuing science.
The process is well documented...all that's needed, is to see it through to its conclusion.
We can't let expectation and desire override patience and common sense...while we have actual scientific data at our finger tips.
I'll conclude with this...after being a visitor for half a century and resident for a short time...I honestly can't remember meeting or talking to anyone, anywhere around the lake, that didn't want or appreciate the presence of visitors to the area (covid transmission aside)....that's my personal observation and opinion.

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