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> Trolling Motor - Kayak Project (Questions), Kayak, Trolling Motor, Questions
Skippy
Posted: Dec 30, 2019 - 06:26 pm


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Hi All,

Not sure if anyone has done anything along these lines, but thought I would ask...

Looking into modifying a trolling motor to install at the stern of my Wilderness Systems Ride 135 over the winter. I have realized that it will require some MacGyvering to make everything work the way that I want it to, but for now wanted to focus on modifying the actual trolling motor.

Last winter I put together something that allowed me to add a trolling motor to the side of my kayak (just behind and to my left). It worked well getting between locations, but having it at the side required manual adjustments from one hand on a fairly regular basis and turning or even going dead straight against wind, waves, current required over steering in many cases – I think based on it being at the side vs. rear. I would really like to have it at the rear of my kayak and use the foot pedals to steer – more hands free to continue fishing…

I have been doing a lot of research on this, but unfortunately am not particularly handy or mechanically inclined (accountant) – feel free to let me know if I am way off track or need to rethink everything…

I have a Minn Kota Endura C2 38 lbs thrust that I plan to use for this purpose.

I am planning to add a Pulse Width Modutor (PWM) – some additional reading = here:
https://www.bassresource.com/bass-fishing-f...comment-2483574

Currently looking into:
https://www.ebay.ca/itm/DC-10-55V-100A-Moto...x0AAOSwiX1d-MGd

From my understanding – with a standard trolling motor – this would be installed between the battery and the trolling motor, leave the trolling motor control to 5 and then the PWM dial would then control the actual speed (100% variable) using the dial. If reverse is required, the above noted PWM has a switch that would need to be used…

What I know so far:
• I was planning to remove the Minn Kota head, shorten the shaft and extend the wires from the motor to my seat (approx. 5 feet).
• Minn Kota’s instruction manuals provide a conductor gauge and circuit breaker sizing table. For 5 feet recommends 10 AWG. For most installations this would be extending just the positive and negative cables running between the battery and trolling motor.
• The Endura has 4 wires running down to the motor – these are significantly smaller gauge than the battery wires that run external to the trolling motor itself.
• Two of the cables are the +ve and -ve for power, while the extra 2, to my knowledge are designed to regulate the speed and convert power into heat as opposed to propulsion – which makes the trolling motor extremely inefficient – hence the use of a maximizer or PWM to improve the power consumption.

What I am currently wrestling with:
1. Will I need 2 control units going forward? The PWM to allow for 100% variable speed control as well as the Minn Kota head set to setting 5? Or can I remove the Minn Kota head from the equation, tying the wires from the trolling motor directly into the PWM and use the PWM to control everything?
2. If the trolling motor head is no longer required and the PWM controls the power flowing from the battery to the motor, can the 2 “extra” wires that regulated speed previously be ignored?
3. I want to extend the wires from the trolling motor forward so that the PWM would sit either directly in front of me or to my left (position TBD but again ~ 5 feet should work). Effectively, my thoughts were battery connected to PWM using the existing battery cables that would normally run from the trolling motor to the battery. Then 5 fees of 10 AWG connecting the PWM directly to the shortened trolling motor via the existing smaller gauge wires.

I think that is a good staring point for now.

Thanks in advance for any assistance.
Scott

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Chrome Bullets
Posted: Jan 02, 2020 - 12:28 am


Fry
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As I read through this I completely get what you are attempting but IMO it's being over complicated.

I literally took a Minn Kota 45 lb thrust and cut the shaft/wires in half. I made up an 6ft wiring harness of the same gauge wires as in the motor. I ran that from the back of the yak up to beside my seat. I put quick connect fittings on either end. I made a plate and mounted the prop to the back then mounted the motor head on the rail beside my seat. No additional PWM's or controllers. Worked great with no issues. My buddy currently has his Wilderness System rigged this same way. I think he's going on year 3.

I ran this way for about 2 years. I realized after losing several fish in the prop that this was not the best set up either. I troll for salmon. Lines were getting cut off when they would shoot one way or the other behind me. Downrigger cables were getting caught in the prop if I turned too quick or a wave sent me sideways. Trust me, YOU DO NOT WANT THAT TO HAPPEN ON THE GREAT LAKES.

I changed to a bow mount 70lb Minn Kota I Pilot. Best move I've made and no more headaches at all. You can see vids of it here in this forum.

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Skippy
Posted: Jan 02, 2020 - 09:49 pm


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Thanks Chrome Bullets,

If I was using a unit with a digital maximizer (Endura Max or Traxxis), I would almost certainly go the route of removing the motor head, shortening the shaft, extending the cables that come from the shaft and putting the motor head beside my seat. It is my understanding that these only have 2 wires (motor +ve and -ve) in the shaft that would need to be extended. I may still end up going that route.

The bow mounted 70lb ipilot would be amazing, but I think it would be a little too much weight on my kayak and a little more than I am willing to spend on this project...

On a side note - through about 10 trips with my side mounted trolling motor, one smallie did manage to get me wrapped around my trolling motor. It was a bit of a pain to get untangled, but I managed. I tend to fish toward the front and side of my kayak, don't troll much and have zero plans on fishing the great lakes in my kayak.

Based on some additional research, I think I have the answers to my previous questions:
1. I have seen several examples where the motor head was completely removed and everything was controlled directly by the PWM.
2. The “extra” two wires controlling speed were not used in those other installations - speed and direction (forward or reverse) was controlled directly by the PWM.
3. I will try to extend the wires from the trolling motor with 10 AWG.

Thanks,
Scott

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randaller
Posted: Jan 06, 2020 - 07:45 am


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Hey Skippy,

I'm at work right now and don't have access to my pictures but I did a quick video of my setup with my Trolling motor

https://youtu.be/FKBeErzzgtI

It's a pretty simple set up and the only thing you really might not be able to do yourself is the metal mounting plate. Have a look and see if this answers any of your questions.

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Skippy
Posted: Jan 06, 2020 - 08:54 pm


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Thanks randaller

I’ve seen your walk through quite a few times (already a subscriber).
Your comment at the start that the motor is sometimes too strong is why I would like to use the PWM or a fully variable speed trolling motor. I doubt that I will be adventurous enough to run my electrical through the hull (at least for now)

I have some ideas on mounting the trolling motor but that will be something I figure out later on.

How do you unlock and lift the trolling motor when you are really shallow or launching/beaching?

Thanks
Scott

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JWall
Posted: Jan 06, 2020 - 09:47 pm


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Just wondering the reason behind wanting to add a trolling motor? I’ve owned several models of pedal drive kayaks since 2009 and have never wanted to have a trolling motor, yet. I mostly fish the Great Lakes for salmon and trout and have wondered about taking it to the blue zone when the weather was right. Going 3-4kms off shore isn’t a big deal with pedal drive and the right winds.

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Chrome Bullets
Posted: Jan 06, 2020 - 11:43 pm


Fry
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QUOTE (JWall @ Jan 06, 2020 - 11:47 pm)
Just wondering the reason behind wanting to add a trolling motor? I’ve owned several models of pedal drive kayaks since 2009 and have never wanted to have a trolling motor, yet. I mostly fish the Great Lakes for salmon and trout and have wondered about taking it to the blue zone when the weather was right. Going 3-4kms off shore isn’t a big deal with pedal drive and the right winds.

I troll the great lakes and wouldn't do it without a motor on my yak. I originally tried without and there was no way I could maintain 3MPH with my legs for hrs on end. Maybe going with the wind in one direction but not the other. Currents out there are unreal some days. I've been on half speed doing 2.8 MPH heading east, turn around and on full speed I'm struggling to hit 2MPH going west...

I pull a camera around down there and understand exactly how the spoons I use work and the speeds they work at. Anything under 2.5 MPH the spoon does not work right at all. Fish will come up and quickly swerve as it is not natural. So for me it is to maintain a natural bait presentation for extended periods of time.

Also try pulling around 2 down riggers with cannonballs or dipsys with flashers and flies for more than 6 hrs under your own leg power. That sux. I've been out with a few that say they do this no problem... within minutes they cannot keep pace and quickly fall behind.

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JWall
Posted: Jan 07, 2020 - 05:34 am


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Fair enough. I don’t usually troll them past late May until they come shallower in August, but I have and you are correct speed is an issue. I remember pulling a rigger and dipsey or 10 colour leadcore together and it was not fun. Just needed the reminder as to why I don’t anymore. Spring however, I’m flatlining with 10lbs test, and the species variety on The Great Lakes is awesome!

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TripleC
Posted: Feb 13, 2020 - 02:22 pm


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Once you motorize a kayak, you will require a valid boating license.

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Skippy
Posted: Feb 13, 2020 - 06:18 pm


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Agreed - I have my pleasure craft operators card, so no issue there.
https://www.tc.gc.ca/eng/marinesafety/debs-...perator-360.htm
Electric trolling motors are specifically included.

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fish bone
Posted: Feb 14, 2020 - 07:24 pm


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I used to troll from H. Revolution 4-5 km offshore without any issues. I bought Torqeedo Ultralight about 5 years ago thinking that I will use it. However, I used it only few times. Mirage drive was enough.
It all depends what kayak you use. You need something fast. Few years back I switched to Kaskazi Marlin. It is paddling kayak but it is fast and easy to maintain good speed. If I paddle/troll 2-3 mph, I barely feel it.
I usually do about 12 -15 km per trip and I am much less tired in Kaskazi then I was in my old hobie.
BTW: Torqeedo is for sale - barely used.

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