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> How to find access to new lakes?
tjames
Posted: Feb 03, 2021 - 06:19 pm


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I see we cant ask on here how to access specific lakes. I drove around today and checked out 3 lakes in Haliburton and area (Dysert/Minden). All three lakes I checked had boat launches but theyre all snowed in and no parking.

Other than parking on narrow single lane roads, is there ways people access these lakes?.

I can see one of the lakes had a lot of snowmobile traffic on and off the lake, but no vehicles anywhere to be seen, and I drove then entire lake lol.

I had checked with google prior to checking, and had spots in mind, but winter and snow makes things different. Its easy to find lakes with the fish Im looking for, but I dont want to that guy that parks on these windy single lane roads.

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mykola
Posted: Feb 04, 2021 - 06:06 am


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Park on the road near the public boat launches.

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Seguin Fisher
Posted: Feb 04, 2021 - 07:29 am


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QUOTE (mykola @ Feb 04, 2021 - 06:06 am)
Park on the road near the public boat launches.

That’s some great advice if you want to get towed or ticketed.
Around here ( Parry Sound/Muskoka), you’ll get a ticket if you park pretty much anywhere on any backroad in the winter. I’ve seen guys on job sites get a ticket for parking on the road, even at the end of roads where there’s a turnaround. If you’ve ever come over a blind hill or corner when the roads are all snowy and visibility isn’t great, only to find a car or several parked right on the road, you’ll know why they ticket people for it. Sometimes the backroads aren’t the best to drive on even when there’s no “obstacles” on them.

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earthling
Posted: Feb 04, 2021 - 08:55 am


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We have never gotten a ticket in that area (YMMV) and we have been visited multiple times by MNR who have never said a thing about parking. The cops in the area are mostly looking at snowmobiles and have never hassled us. Bottom line however is that an ATV/snowmobile is going to give you a lot more options.

It helps to do some summer scouting as well.

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Omcdinosaur
Posted: Feb 04, 2021 - 09:23 am


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Public access around Haliburton/Minden smaller lakes can be an issue... most of the larger lakes around here have plowed road access and cleared launch areas. Once off the beaten track though, the no trespassing an private property signs are rampant. As long as you follow traffic rules, parking on sideroads is not a problem (not one laners, as they are usually not assumed and privately plowed), even on the shoulder of hwy 35 is tolerated. All lakes up here have an access point, but you'll need a snowmobile to access the paths/trails on a lot of them. PM me if you are looking for specific lakes, I may be able to help you out. We walk out different lakes as we don't have a snowobile either. It's a shame that peeps who can't afford boats, lose out on lake access in winter as their only oportunity to get off the shore. I haven't tried asking a year round resident or a motel owner if I could pay him to park yet. That may work too. Good luck!

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YNZ
Posted: Feb 04, 2021 - 10:09 am


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I've done the same waiting for simcoe! Looked up small stocked lakes on the Fish-on website and zoom in all the way and you get a clear sat picture of the launches and even fallen logs in the lake. I find it better than google maps. Drove up in winter with 3-4 lakes in mind and its def hit or miss with access. Keep at it and you will find plowed areas to park. Smitty is key when dragging in gear! Its great when you find a place to park safely and get on fish! Not for everyone but put in the work and scout and you will be rewarded, even if I get skunked its amazing to be out!

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Knuguy
Posted: Feb 04, 2021 - 12:10 pm


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If you look at sat winter pix on Google Earth you can see skidoo tracks leading unto the ice---might be a good access spot.

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tjames
Posted: Feb 04, 2021 - 08:01 pm


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Thanks for the replies.

I do have an ATV. Sometimes makes it harder finding truck and trailer parking.

I noticed a ton of “no trespassing” signs some places I went as well as some home made no parking, or some people park their car or trailer blocking things.

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troutlover
Posted: Feb 04, 2021 - 08:41 pm


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If you at all worried about were your gonna park or if your gonna get towed lol call the bylaw there actaully really nice and informative.

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Limacharley
Posted: Feb 05, 2021 - 08:08 am


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I use...

-Fish Online for the list of lakes and their fish population,
-Google Earth provides an overview of the area and might provide access points and
-Crown Land Use Policy website provides where Crown Land is located.

Calling the bylaw guy in the area in question provides you where to park for the lake in question.

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tjames
Posted: Feb 06, 2021 - 05:04 pm


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QUOTE (Omcdinosaur @ Feb 04, 2021 - 10:23 am)
Public access around Haliburton/Minden smaller lakes can be an issue... most of the larger lakes around here have plowed road access and cleared launch areas. Once off the beaten track though, the no trespassing an private property signs are rampant. As long as you follow traffic rules, parking on sideroads is not a problem (not one laners, as they are usually not assumed and privately plowed), even on the shoulder of hwy 35 is tolerated. All lakes up here have an access point, but you'll need a snowmobile to access the paths/trails on a lot of them. PM me if you are looking for specific lakes, I may be able to help you out. We walk out different lakes as we don't have a snowobile either. It's a shame that peeps who can't afford boats, lose out on lake access in winter as their only oportunity to get off the shore. I haven't tried asking a year round resident or a motel owner if I could pay him to park yet. That may work too. Good luck!

Thanks,

I don’t think you have enough posts to accept PMs.

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Omcdinosaur
Posted: Feb 09, 2021 - 12:51 pm


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Sorry about that, right. Wanted to mention a map available from haliburton county that is interactive with land use stuff mostly, but there is a filter for lake trout lakes with the area lakes highlighted with 2 catergories at capacity, and not at capacity. I believe they are referring to amount of fish that can be supported in the lake. Most of the big lakes are under capacity and have line limits, pretty much all the big lakes on hwy 35 from coboconk to Dorset have a single line limit.

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earthling
Posted: Feb 09, 2021 - 04:12 pm


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QUOTE (Omcdinosaur @ Feb 09, 2021 - 12:51 pm)
Sorry about that, right. Wanted to mention a map available from haliburton county that is interactive with land use stuff mostly, but there is a filter for lake trout lakes with the area lakes highlighted with 2 catergories at capacity, and not at capacity. I believe they are referring to amount of fish that can be supported in the lake. Most of the big lakes are under capacity and have line limits, pretty much all the big lakes on hwy 35 from coboconk to Dorset have a single line limit.

The reference to 'at capacity' or 'under capacity' is a reference to nutrient loading in the lake. I have no idea what the definitions are for nutrient loading, I asked the planning folks what that meant but did not get any answer other than what is in the official county plan (which is nothing).


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earthling
Posted: Feb 09, 2021 - 05:14 pm


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QUOTE (earthling @ Feb 09, 2021 - 04:12 pm)
QUOTE (Omcdinosaur @ Feb 09, 2021 - 12:51 pm)
Sorry about that, right.  Wanted to mention a map available from haliburton county that is interactive with land use stuff mostly, but there is a filter for lake trout lakes with the area lakes highlighted with 2 catergories  at capacity, and not at capacity.  I believe they are referring to amount of fish that can be supported in the lake.  Most of the big lakes are under capacity and have line limits, pretty much all the big lakes on hwy 35 from coboconk to Dorset have a single line limit.

The reference to 'at capacity' or 'under capacity' is a reference to nutrient loading in the lake. I have no idea what the definitions are for nutrient loading, I asked the planning folks what that meant but did not get any answer other than what is in the official county plan (which is nothing).

Actually I think I get it now.

The lakes themselves are classified as 'lake trout lakes' and 'not lake trout lakes' and the statement about 'at capacity' or 'under capacity' is a reference to nutrient loads which are a measure for whether or not the lake can handle greater influx of nutrients by way of outside sources (septic systems, farming, etc). When the lake is classified as 'at capacity' it means that the lake cannot handle any more influx, and when it is 'under capacity' it means that the lakes are able to deal with more which paves the way for additional building sites or zoning changes around the lake.

In short:

The maps are used by the planning commission as the official plan/guideline and those terms are more about whether or not the lake can support additional building sites around the lake.

The reason that Haliburton cares about 'lake trout' vs 'not lake trout' is due to the fact that there are two fish unique to haliburton and conservation of those species is recognized in the official plan which is available here;

https://www.haliburtoncounty.ca/en/planning...l-Plan-2017.pdf

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tjames
Posted: Feb 09, 2021 - 06:16 pm


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QUOTE (earthling @ Feb 09, 2021 - 06:14 pm)
QUOTE (earthling @ Feb 09, 2021 - 04:12 pm)
QUOTE (Omcdinosaur @ Feb 09, 2021 - 12:51 pm)
Sorry about that, right.  Wanted to mention a map available from haliburton county that is interactive with land use stuff mostly, but there is a filter for lake trout lakes with the area lakes highlighted with 2 catergories  at capacity, and not at capacity.  I believe they are referring to amount of fish that can be supported in the lake.  Most of the big lakes are under capacity and have line limits, pretty much all the big lakes on hwy 35 from coboconk to Dorset have a single line limit.

The reference to 'at capacity' or 'under capacity' is a reference to nutrient loading in the lake. I have no idea what the definitions are for nutrient loading, I asked the planning folks what that meant but did not get any answer other than what is in the official county plan (which is nothing).

Actually I think I get it now.

The lakes themselves are classified as 'lake trout lakes' and 'not lake trout lakes' and the statement about 'at capacity' or 'under capacity' is a reference to nutrient loads which are a measure for whether or not the lake can handle greater influx of nutrients by way of outside sources (septic systems, farming, etc). When the lake is classified as 'at capacity' it means that the lake cannot handle any more influx, and when it is 'under capacity' it means that the lakes are able to deal with more which paves the way for additional building sites or zoning changes around the lake.

In short:

The maps are used by the planning commission as the official plan/guideline and those terms are more about whether or not the lake can support additional building sites around the lake.

The reason that Haliburton cares about 'lake trout' vs 'not lake trout' is due to the fact that there are two fish unique to haliburton and conservation of those species is recognized in the official plan which is available here;

https://www.haliburtoncounty.ca/en/planning...l-Plan-2017.pdf

thanks for that, that makes sense, I found the map, its really no more helpful then fishonline.

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